Skip to content

Inside Versailles

September 26, 2012

It is said that details are what makes a difference when distinguishing between ordinary and extraordinary, and there is no better example of this statement then in the Château de Versailles. Every inch of every detail of the Château and it’s grounds were made to impress. Every painted ceiling, gilded door knob, or intricate fabric pattern epitomized royal elegance in the highest style of Old Europe.

Marie Antoinette’s bedroom is one of the most over-the-top rooms I have ever been in. Supposedly Marie Antoinette liked to sleep in a smaller room somewhere else in the palace, but this room was used for her personal receptions and ceremonies including getting up and going to bed. This room was also where the Marie Antoinette was required to give birth.

Marie Antoinette is the only queen to have imposed her personal style on Versailles and the details of her room is a great example of that. The pattern that decorates the walls and bed contain roses, ribbons, peacocks and their feathers, is one of the most easily recognized girly fabrics of all time. Her insignia (a combined M and A) not only decorate the headboard but are also carved into the walls. The room also includes details of her past life before she became Queen, including her mother’s and brother’s portraits and an Imperial eagle which tops the canopy of her bed.

The photo below was taken off of the Versailles website. I thought I should show you the entire room so you could get a sense of how grand the room really was.

The gilded halls, walls, moldings, doorways and pretty much any other small gilded details which are in Versailles are the biggest example of the opulence of the French monarchy during this time period. What is hard to imagine is that during the actual reign of these Kings even more things were gilded.

Charles Le Brun directed the team of artists who decorated the ceilings at Versailles. These ceilings are just an example of the time and effort which went into making Versailles what it was.

No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: